<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:times new roman,serif;font-size:large"><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Tue, Jan 11, 2022 at 10:48 AM Clem Cole <<a href="mailto:clemc@ccc.com" target="_blank">clemc@ccc.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><font color="#0000ff"></font><span style="color:rgb(0,0,255);font-family:Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif">I do believe that you are correct that both the sources (and associated binaries) to original nroff/groff and ditroff were licensed and needed and an AT&T license, but not the documents themselves.</span></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large">I assume you mean s/groff/troff/.  There must have been some public access to the documentation like this that allowed James Clark to develop groff in the 1987-91 time frame, though.  It's still the *roff shipped with *BSD.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large">dformat, a pic preprocessor by Jon Bentley that displays bits-in-a-word pictures, is now available at <<a href="https://github.com/arnoldrobbins/dformat">https://github.com/arnoldrobbins/dformat</a>>; it's written in awk.</div></div></div>