<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small">I never had the pleasure of playing with Transputers, but it sounds nice.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small">Of course, I'd want the networking to be Ethernet/IP centric these days.</div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Wed, Aug 11, 2021 at 11:11 AM Tom Ivar Helbekkmo <<a href="mailto:tih@hamartun.priv.no">tih@hamartun.priv.no</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">Tom Lyon via TUHS <<a href="mailto:tuhs@minnie.tuhs.org" target="_blank">tuhs@minnie.tuhs.org</a>> writes:<br>
<br>
> What if CPU designers would add facilities to directly implement<br>
> inter-process or inter-processor messaging?<br>
<br>
You mean like INMOS's Transputer architecture from back in the late<br>
eighties and early nineties?  Each processor had a thread scheduling and<br>
message passing microkernel implemented in its microcode, and had four<br>
bi-directional links to other processors, so you could build a grid.<br>
They designed the language Occam along with it, to be its lowest level<br>
language; it and the instruction set were designed to match.  Occam has<br>
threads and message passing as built-in concepts, of course.<br>
<br>
-tih (playing with the Helios distributed OS on Transputer hardware)<br>
-- <br>
Most people who graduate with CS degrees don't understand the significance<br>
of Lisp.  Lisp is the most important idea in computer science.  --Alan Kay<br>
</blockquote></div><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">- Tom</div></div>