<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:times new roman,serif;font-size:large"><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Fri, Aug 6, 2021 at 7:49 PM Norman Wilson <<a href="mailto:norman@oclsc.org">norman@oclsc.org</a>> wrote:</div><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr"><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">He used to<br>
fill the envelopes with lead and drop them in the mail,<br>
in the hope that he would cost the party even more in<br>
excess postage than they were already spending to send<br>
the funding pitches.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large">Piker.  *Real* practitioners of this sport would attach a business-reply label (basically a postcard you can affix to a package) to a *brick*, thus easily sticking the recipient for US$5 or more, of course worth a lot more backintheday.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large">For many years now, though, anything like either case is officially classified as "waste", which means the USPS throws it out before it ever gets anywhere, same as happens when you dump your trash into a mailbox.  I suppose Canada Post does the same.</div></div></div>