<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:times new roman,serif;font-size:large"><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Mon, Aug 2, 2021 at 2:16 PM Adam Thornton <<a href="mailto:athornton@gmail.com">athornton@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>fork() is a great model for a single-threaded text processing pipeline to do automated typesetting.  (More generally, anything that is a straightforward composition of filter/transform stages.)  Which is, y'know, what Unix is *for*.<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large">Indeed.  But it's also a very good model for "baking" web pages in the background so that you can serve them up with a plain dumb web server, maybe with a bit of JS to provide some auto-updating, especially if the source data is stored not in a database but in the file system.  The result is a page that displays (modulo network latency) as fast as you can hit the Enter key in the address bar.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large">(The weak point is the lack of dependency management when the system is too big to rebake all the pages each time.  Perhaps make(1), which Alex Shinn described as "a beautiful little Prolog for the file system", is the Right Thing.)</div></div></div>