<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:times new roman,serif;font-size:large"><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Mon, Aug 2, 2021 at 6:00 PM Jon Steinhart <<a href="mailto:jon@fourwinds.com">jon@fourwinds.com</a>> wrote:></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
Oh, sorry, wasn't meaning to be categorical there.  Main reason that it came<br>
to mind was John's web example; many have said in the past that the UNIX<br>
model couldn't do that until they figured out that it actually could.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large">I sorta lost track of what I was saying there: spawn*() would work fine in pipelines, since they involve fork-quickly-followed-by-exec.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large">Doug's nifty sieve example, on the other hand, would not: the Right Thing there is Go, or else goroutines in C (either libmill or its successor libdill as you prefer) since the sieve doesn't actually involve any sort of global state for which processes are relevant.  Granted, the C libraries have a little bit of x86_64 asm in them (but you are not expected to understand this). </div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large"><br></div></div></div>