<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:times new roman,serif;font-size:large"><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Thu, Jan 28, 2021 at 6:06 PM Jon Steinhart <<a href="mailto:jon@fourwinds.com">jon@fourwinds.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">I have always found the I Ching to be an invaluable tool for<br>
making difficult management decisions.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large">Or any other kind of decisions.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><font face="times new roman, serif" style=""><font size="4">Some of you may find amusing my (regrettably incomplete) "The Unix Power Classic: A book about the Unix Way and its power" at <<a href="http://vrici.lojban.org/~cowan/upc/">http://vrici.lojban.org/~cowan/upc/</a>>.  Section 41 seems to be the most popular:</font></font></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><font face="times new roman, serif" style=""><font size="4"><br></font></font></div><div class="gmail_default" style="">Thoughtful hackers hear about Unix<br>   and try to use it.<br>Ordinary hackers hear about Unix<br>   and mess about with it a little.<br>Thoughtless hackers hear about Unix<br>   and crack wise about it.<br>It wouldn't be Unix<br>   if there weren't wisecracks about it.<br><br>So we establish the following rules:<br><br>The most brilliant Unix seems the most obscure.<br>Advanced Unix seems like retrocomputing.<br>The most powerful code seems like just loops and conditionals.<br>The clearest code seems to be opaque.<br>The sharpest tools seem inadequate.<br>Solid code seems flaky.<br>Stable code seems to change.<br><br>Great methodologies don't have boundaries.<br>Great talent doesn't code fast.<br>Great music makes no sound.<br>The ideal elephant has no shape.<br>The Unix Way has no name.<br><br>Yet for just this reason<br>   it brings things to perfection.<font face="times new roman, serif" style=""><font size="4"><br></font></font></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:"times new roman",serif;font-size:large"><span style="font-family:Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">John Cowan          <a href="http://vrici.lojban.org/~cowan">http://vrici.lojban.org/~cowan</a>        <a href="mailto:cowan@ccil.org">cowan@ccil.org</a></span></div>The native charset of SMS messages supports English, French, mainland<br>Scandinavian languages, German, Italian, Spanish with no accents, and<br>GREEK SHOUTING.  Everything else has to be Unicode, which means you get<br>only 70 16-bit characters in a text instead of 160 7-bit characters.</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div></div>