<div dir="ltr">> It had no XDR because it was "reader makes it right" and datatypes<br><div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
> were tagged. <br>
<br>
That's the first I've heard of that and I really like it.  Most of the<br>
time, you are on a network of machines that are the same, so why have<br>
a network byte order, reader makes it right will just work.  Neat.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I guess I don't quite understand that. I can get how it works for simple data types (integers, floating point numbers, perhaps strings) but it seems like it breaks</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>It was only for native types  <a href="https://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9629399/chap14.htm">https://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9629399/chap14.htm</a>   The other things -- struct, array, pointers, etc -- have rules.  See the link if you care for nitty-gritty details.</div><div><br> </div></div></div></div>