<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Wed, 6 Jan 2021 at 11:40, Dario Niedermann <<a href="mailto:dario@darioniedermann.it">dario@darioniedermann.it</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">Il 31/12/2020 alle 16:30, Warner Losh ha scritto:<br>
<br>
>On Thu, Dec 31, 2020, 1:10 AM <<a href="mailto:arnold@skeeve.com" target="_blank">arnold@skeeve.com</a>> wrote:<br>
[...]<br>
>>time_t these days tends to be 64 bits, and I think at least the Linux <br>
>>file systems store them that way.<br>
><br>
>Time_t was still 32 bits last I checked on i386 and a few others...<br>
<br>
On recent Linux/i386 kernels it's actually 64 bits. In practice, only <br>
users who are stuck with old i386 Linux versions will have a problem.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Do you happen to know what the cutoff is?  Are 2.6 kernels (still very common) safe?  3.x?  4.x?</div><div><br></div><div>-Henry<br></div></div></div>