<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Tue, Feb 11, 2020 at 4:59 AM Rob Pike <<a href="mailto:robpike@gmail.com">robpike@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">My general mood about the current standard way of nerd working is how unimaginative and old-fashioned it feels. There are countless ways we could be interacting with our terminals, editors, and shells while we program, but for various sociological and historical reasons we're pretty much using one from decades ago. I'm sure it's productive for almost everyone, but it seems dull to me. We could be doing something much more dynamic. I mean, xterm is hardly more sophisticated than the lame terminal code that ran in mpx (ca. 1982), other than colors and cursor addressing, which date from the 1960s via early PCs. IDEs don't sing to me, although they are powerful, because they don't integrate well with the environment, only with the language. And they are just lots of features, not a coherent vision. No model to speak of.</div></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><br></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">Compare what happened with our shell windows with what happened with our "smart" phones in the last 20 years and you'll get some inkling of what I think we're missing. It's not that we should program the way we use iPhones, but that there are fields where user interface work has made a real different recently. Not so in programming, though. We're missing out.</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><div>What do you think of thinks like Jupyter or Lighttable?  The early demos for the latter, I thought, were particularly compelling (though sadly the current implementation seems like much more of a traditional text editor and far removed from the original vision). Compare <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H58-n7uldoU">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H58-n7uldoU</a> to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52SVAMM3V78">www.youtube.com/watch?v=52SVAMM3V78</a></div><div></div></div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>But I'm a grumpy old man and getting far off topic. Warren should cry, "enough!".</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>One of the reasons we study history is to understand the present and inform our decisions for the future. Personally, I enjoy these sorts of explorations of where we might have done things differently.</div><div><br></div><div>        - Dan C.</div><div><br></div></div></div></div></div></div>