<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Wed, Sep 11, 2019 at 2:11 PM Larry McVoy <<a href="mailto:lm@mcvoy.com">lm@mcvoy.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><font color="#ff0000">The problem was that Sun was in financial hot water and AT&T wanted SVR4<br>
to be the industry standard. <span class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif">...</span>  It would have been<br>
much better if Sun had licensed their source base to AT&T and then<br>
AT&T could have leveraged the industry standard.  </font></blockquote><div><span class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif">I think those two statements say everything.  Sun was not in a position to negotiate and AT&T desperately wanted SVR4 to be the standard - I think it was corporate pride. (which I also think was mixed up the BSDi/UCB case too - if they had let it go it would have been a darned site smarter).</span></div><div><br></div><div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif">If AT&T could have swallowed and excepted somebody other than them having the 'high order bit' it might have worked.  As you say, leveraged the industry standard.  Instead is just added to the fighting.</div><br></div></div></div>