<br><br>On Sunday, February 3, 2019, Steve Nickolas <<a href="mailto:usotsuki@buric.co">usotsuki@buric.co</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">On Mon, 4 Feb 2019, Dave Horsfall wrote:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
On Mon, 4 Feb 2019, Greg 'groggy' Lehey wrote:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Without Unix, Microsoft would not have created Microsoft "Windows".<br>
</blockquote>
<br>
I'd like to see some evidence for that; without Unix, what would we be running now?  I doubt whether it would've been Linux, there being no inspiration for it...<br>
<br>
My vague (and rough) recollection is CP/M -> DOS -> Windows.<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Even it has roots in Unix.<br>
</blockquote>
<br>
Only inasmuch as it has directories, users, and permissions (which any semi-decent OS would have anyway)...  Admittedly I have never compromised my integrity by using/programming it, so I am willing to be corrected.<br>
<br>
And yes, I know about POSIX compatibility, but so is Linux, and it's different enough from Unix to be damned annoying.<br>
<br>
-- Dave<br>
<br>
</blockquote>
<br>
Keep in mind that the MS-DOS 2 "handles" API for file access is based *directly* on Xenix, and replaced the MS-DOS 1 "FCB" API borrowed from CP/M.<br><br>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div>And also don't forget that Xenix had the largest UNIX installed base measured by the number of machines it was installed on.  People talking about BSD and System V in the 80s, but it was Xenix that ruled on micros.  So at the time Microsoft offered both UNIX and MS-DOS.</div><div><br></div><div>--Andy</div>