<div dir="auto"><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Thu, Nov 8, 2018, 1:23 PM Doug McIlroy <<a href="mailto:doug@cs.dartmouth.edu">doug@cs.dartmouth.edu</a> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Peter Adams, who photographed many Unix folks for his<br>
"Faces of open source" series (<a href="http://facesofopensource.com/" rel="noreferrer noreferrer" target="_blank">http://facesofopensource.com/</a>),<br>
found trinkets from the Unix lab in the Bell Labs archives:<br>
<a href="http://www.peteradamsphoto.com/unix-folklore/" rel="noreferrer noreferrer" target="_blank">http://www.peteradamsphoto.com/unix-folklore/</a>.<br>
<br>
One item is more than a trinket. Belle, built by<br>
Ken Thompson and Joe Condon, won the world computer<br>
chess championship in 1980 and became the first<br>
machine to gain a chess master rating. Physically,<br>
it's about a two-foot cube.<br>
<br>
Doug<br></blockquote></div></div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">Furthermore,¬†Feng-hsiung Hsu at CMU essentially put Belle on a chip and parallelized it, resulting in the chess computer Deep Thought -- which became the first machine to defeat a human Grandmaster. It lost a historic match against the world champion Garry Kasparov, but its successor, Deep Blue, went on to defeat him.</div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">My favorite anecdote that I've read regarding Belle was when Ken Thompson took it out of the country for a competition. Someone, I'm assuming with customs, asked him if Belle could be classified as munitions in any way. He replied, "Only if you drop it out the window."</div><div dir="auto"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
</blockquote></div></div></div>