<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Tue, Oct 16, 2018 at 10:40 AM Noel Chiappa <<a href="mailto:jnc@mercury.lcs.mit.edu">jnc@mercury.lcs.mit.edu</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">    > From: Dave Horsfall<br>
<br>
    > We lost ... on this day<br>
<br>
An email from someone on a related topic has reminded me of someone else you<br>
should make sure is only your list (not sure if you already have him):<br>
J. C. R. Licklider; we lost him on June 26, 1990.<br>
<br>
He didn't write much code himself, but the work of people he funded (e.g.<br>
Doug Engelbart, the ARPANet guys, Multics, etc, etc, etc) to work on his<br>
vision has led to today's computerized, information-rich world. For people who<br>
only know today's networked world, the change from what came before, and thus<br>
his impact on the world (since his ideas and the work of people he sponsored<br>
led, directly and indirectly, to much of it), is probably hard to truly<br>
fathom.<br>
<br>
He is, in my estimation, one of the most important and influential computer<br>
scientists of all. I wonder how many computer science people had more of an<br>
impact; the list is surely pretty short. Babbage; Turing; who else?<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Perhaps I've mentioned this short movie from 1971 before, but it's well worth a watch: "Computer Networks: The Heralds of Resource Sharing" (<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjZ7ktIlSM0">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjZ7ktIlSM0</a>)</div><div><br></div><div>Licklider, Khan and other players from the early days of the ARPAnet figure prominently. It's amazingly prescient.</div><div><br></div><div>        - Dan C.</div><div><br></div></div></div></div>