<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small">"Grep" as a verb expanded beyond files. I recall a friend saying they were "grepping for their keys on the dresser".</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 7:39 AM, Doug McIlroy <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:doug@cs.dartmouth.edu" target="_blank">doug@cs.dartmouth.edu</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Arnold was clerly on the Unix Room wavelength. ^All those two-letter<br>
commands were spelled out in conversation, even m-v. The pronunciation<br>
of rmdir was hybrid: r-m-dir. But when one talked about an action--not<br>
a command per se--verbs would be used: move or copy a file, list<br>
a directory. The famous exception is grep, which became a verb. There<br>
was no snappy ready-made verb that covered all the aspects of its use:<br>
search for mentions in one file, find files that mention, look for<br>
patterns, filter data, check for malformed data, ... The verb had<br>
two idiomatic variants, "grep for" and "grep out".<br>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>
Doug<br>
</font></span></blockquote></div><br></div>