<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-size:small">Interesting that of all the commands mentioned, ar is (at least for me) no longer used (although I haven't used ed in many years). As I recall it, ar was mostly of use to address the extremely low limits on inodes and disk space: the former by packing a bunch of files/inodes into a single file, the latter by saving the wasted space on any file that wasn't a multiple of 512 bytes. I guess it lives on in the creation of "libraries" that could be loaded by compilers, although I think shared objects have largely replaced archive files, and I'm not sure if archive files are even accepted any more.</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jul 17, 2018 at 9:20 AM,  <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:arnold@skeeve.com" target="_blank">arnold@skeeve.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><span class="">Nemo <<a href="mailto:cym224@gmail.com">cym224@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> I was intrigued by BMK's comment that "ed" was never spokend as "ed"<br>
> by "those in the know", which leads me to wonder how things were<br>
> spoken.<br>
<br>
</span>I always spelled out the two-letter commands: e-d, a-r, l-s, r-m, c-p.<br>
chmod I pronounced as ch-mod (not mode), but 'rmdir' was 'remove dir'<br>
and for some reason, mv was move. (I think the doc for vi officially<br>
stated that the proram's name was to be pronounced v-i and not 'vie'.)<br>
<br>
Undoubtedly there were many regional differences... :-)<br>
<br>
Arnold<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>