<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body dir="auto">I am a fan of these routines, and use the regularly, but I didn’t write them.<br><br><div id="AppleMailSignature">Message by ches. Tappos by iPad.<div><br></div></div><div><br>On Jul 10, 2018, at 9:50 PM, Noel Hunt <<a href="mailto:noel.hunt@gmail.com">noel.hunt@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:monospace,monospace">I'm surprised why anyone would bother with these routines</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:monospace,monospace">anymore, given the startling simplicity of Plan9's arg(3).</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:monospace,monospace">One stands in awe of such simplicity. I believe it was</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:monospace,monospace">William Cheswick who designed it, but I may be wrong.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:monospace,monospace"><br></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Tue, Jul 10, 2018 at 5:25 PM <<a href="mailto:arnold@skeeve.com">arnold@skeeve.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">RFS vs. NFS and sockets vs. STREAMS were much more serious; they were<br>
about the directions Unix would take going forward, where interoperability<br>
(RFS/NFS) and code portability (sockets/STREAMS) were big either/or issues.<br>
<br>
Had AT&T been smarter about its licensing, both RFS and STREAMS might<br>
have "won", but they weren't, and those technologies have all but<br>
disappeared.<br>
<br>
GNU getopt can be used in a source-compatible way with POSIX getopt;<br>
having long options is up to the programmer.  I agree, there were<br>
aesthetic arguments, altough long options have mostly "won".  I'm about<br>
as long-time a Unix aficianado as anyone else here, and for many things<br>
I find long options easier to remember than short ones.<br>
<br>
(To their credit, at least initially, the GNU project asked its developers<br>
to use the same long options in all programs for operations that were<br>
the same.)<br>
<br>
Arnold<br>
<br>
<br>
George Michaelson <<a href="mailto:ggm@algebras.org" target="_blank">ggm@algebras.org</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> ... and then somebody GNUified it. I seem to recall three huge<br>
> flamewars in UUCP days: RFS vs NFS, STREAMS (the original) vs sockets,<br>
> and getopt<br>
><br>
> --no -noo --nooo=please --dont-make-me=do-that<br>
><br>
> On Tue, Jul 10, 2018 at 3:54 PM,  <<a href="mailto:arnold@skeeve.com" target="_blank">arnold@skeeve.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> > Clem Cole <<a href="mailto:clemc@ccc.com" target="_blank">clemc@ccc.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> ><br>
> >> BY the time dmr adds stdio, it was<br>
> >> still early enough in the life to displace the randomness for something as<br>
> >> important as I/O, whereas lack of use of something.like getopt would not<br>
> >> become clearly deficient until after widespread success.<br>
> ><br>
> > I think "widespread access" is more like it for getopt.  Getopt dates<br>
> > to 1980; it was in System III (I just checked). That's only about two years<br>
> > after V7 which was circa 1978.<br>
> ><br>
> > Here are the dates:<br>
> ><br>
> > -rw-rw-r-- 1 arnold arnold 1073 Apr 11  1980 usr/src/lib/libc/pdp11/gen/getopt.c<br>
> > -rw-rw-r-- 1 arnold arnold 2273 May 16  1980 usr/src/man/man3/getopt.3c<br>
> ><br>
> > But the world outside the Bell System didn't have System III. Getopt<br>
> > didn't become "popular" until System V or so, and became much easier to<br>
> > adopt once Henry Spencer published his public domain rewrite of the code<br>
> > and man page.<br>
> ><br>
> > Just a nit, (:-)<br>
> ><br>
> > Arnold<br>
</blockquote></div>
</div></blockquote></body></html>