<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Jun 30, 2018 at 1:11 PM, Andy Kosela <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:akosela@andykosela.com" target="_blank">akosela@andykosela.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><span class=""><br><br>On Saturday, June 30, 2018, Warner Losh <<a href="mailto:imp@bsdimp.com" target="_blank">imp@bsdimp.com</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">Greetings,<div><br></div><div>I'd like to thank everybody that sent me data for my unix kernel size stuff. There's two artifacts I've crated. One I think I've shared before, which is my spreadsheet:</div><div><a href="https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/13C77pmJFw4ZBmGJuNarBUvWBxBKWXG-jtvARxJDHiXs/edit?usp=sharing" target="_blank">https://docs.google.com/spread<wbr>sheets/d/13C77pmJFw4ZBmGJuNarB<wbr>UvWBxBKWXG-jtvARxJDHiXs/edit?<wbr>usp=sharing</a><br></div><div><br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></span><div>It would be interesting to compare it to Linux throughout the history.  I can still compile a minimal latest Linux kernel that is around 2M.  Not bad if you ask me.</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>It's possible to build FreeBSD much smaller as well (some ARM ports can get that small)... But that's not the comparison I was going for since that often understates the effect of the SCSI/SATA stack you need these days, or the network stack, or other technology that's considered 'standard.' It's entirely due to ease of use and cheap memory.</div><div><br></div><div>I didn't include a growth of the Linux kernel due to the less-prevalent use of GENERIC-type kernels there, and a lack of good data sources I could mine quickly for apples-to-apples comparisons over time.</div><div><br></div><div>Warner </div></div></div></div>