<div dir="ltr">On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 10:55 AM, Clem cole <<a href="mailto:clemc@ccc.com">clemc@ccc.com</a>> wrote:<br>> On May 15, 2018, at 10:37 AM, Dan Cross <<a href="mailto:crossd@gmail.com">crossd@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>> > On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 10:07 AM, Nemo <<a href="mailto:cym224@gmail.com">cym224@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>> > > On 14/05/2018, Dave Horsfall <<a href="mailto:dave@horsfall.org">dave@horsfall.org</a>> wrote (in part):<br>> > > > I had a boss once who demanded that we learn -mm; for some reason I still<br>> > > > preferred -ms, as it somehow seemed more "natural", and I still use it to<br>> > > > this day (well, when I'm not using the Mac, that is).<br>> > ><br>> > > Why not? The Mac has it: /usr/share/groff/1.19.2/tmac/s.tmac<br>> ><br>> > I have some vague distant memory of a commercial Unix variant that came with troff and the -mm macros, but without -ms. I can't remember which it was (or if I'm just imagining things). Anyone have any ideas?<br>><br>> The PWB children used -mm  I seem to remember that the base system 3 and maybe the original sysv did not include it since troff was not apart. If you pulled from BSD or ditroff; you got it.<div><br></div><div>Maybe that's what it was. Let's see, System V's I have known and loathed[*]:</div><div><br></div><div>AIX on RT and RS/6k, Irix, HP-UX, UNISYS, Solaris 2.x for x in 2-5; perhaps others that I can't recall now.</div><div><br></div><div>Perhaps it was one of them? For some reason, AIX is sticking out in my head as not having the full compliment of troff macros as supplied by BSD distributions. Something *definitely* didn't come with -me, though I can't recall what now.</div><div><br></div><div>        - Dan C.</div><div><br></div><div>[*] "Loathed" is entirely too strong of a word, but in the enthusiasm of first exposure combined with the headiness (read: ignorance) of youth, it was easy to fall prey to the tribalism of the pro-BSD people on my campus; the response was less rational and more emotional. That said, we've covered in great depth on this list how Solaris 2.x, in particular, was rushed to market too early; attempts at conversion from SunOS 4.x were fraught and that left a bad taste for some time. Like wanting to wear the same jacket as a rock star, wanting to run the same software as one's idols was an attempt to gather some amount of cachet that was unwarranted. But just as the music I listened to when I was 8 years old was dramatically different than the music that I liked at 13, which is still somewhat removed from that which I listen to most often now (though curiously there is much more continuity there), I find that I wouldn't really want to go back to SunOS 4 on a SPARCstation 1, let alone 4.3BSD on a VAX, even with a relatively nice HP or DEC terminal.</div></div>