<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Dec 6, 2017 at 11:15 AM, Jon Steinhart <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jon@fourwinds.com" target="_blank">jon@fourwinds.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div class="m_8761011660850177358gmail-HOEnZb"><div class="m_8761011660850177358gmail-h5">Random832 writes:<br>
> On Tue, Dec 5, 2017, at 20:07, Warren Toomey wrote:<br>
> >  Ken tried to send it out, but the lawyers kept<br>
> >       stalling and stalling and stalling.<br>
> ><br>
> >       When the lawyers found out about it, they called every<br>
> >       licensee and threatened them with dire consequences if they<br>
> >       didn’t destroy the tape, after trying to find out how they got<br>
> >       the tape. I would guess that no one would actually tell them<br>
> >       how they came by the tape (I didn’t).<br>
><br>
> I have a question, if anyone has any idea... is there any recorded<br>
> knowledge about *who was driving*? That is, beyond "the lawyers", who on<br>
> the business side of AT&T was making the policy decisions that led to<br>
> the various sometimes bizarre legal actions that caused problems for the<br>
> Unix world, and to what end (was there some way they expected to profit?<br>
> liability concerns?)<br>
><br>
> In other words, what was the basis of the legal department's mandate to<br>
> try to shut these things down? (This question is also something I've<br>
> wondered for some non-Unix stuff like the E911 document, but that's not<br>
> relevant to this list)<br>
<br>
</div></div>Can't answer your question directly, but I think that some of this was<br>
the result of the prior consent decree banning them from being in the<br>
data business.  I seem to recall that it was technically illegal for<br>
them to sell SW and don't know how giving it away would have been viewed.<br>
</blockquote></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><font color="#0000ff" style=""><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">​I really think Jon is correct here.  The behavior was all left over from the 1956 consent decree, which settled the 1949 anti-trust case against AT&T.</font></font></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><font color="#0000ff" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><font color="#0000ff" style=""><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">As the recipients of the AT&T IP, we used to refer the behavior as "UNIX was abandoned on your doorstep."  Throughout the 60s and 70s, the AT&T sr management from the CEO on down, were terrified of another anti-trust case.  And of course they got one and we all know what judge Green did to resolve that in 1980.</font></font></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><font color="#0000ff" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><br></font></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><font color="#0000ff" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">I described the activities/actions in detail in my paper: <i>"</i><i>UNIX: A View from the Field as We Played the
Game" </i>which I gave last fall in Paris​.  The proceeding are supposed to go on line at some point.  Send me email if you want the details and I'll send you a PDF.   I'm holding off cutting and pasting here for reasons of brevity.  For an legal analysis I also recommend: <i style="text-align:justify"><span lang="FR">“AT&T Divestiture &
the Telecommunications Market”,</span></i><span lang="FR" style="text-align:justify"> John Pinheiro,
Berkeley Technical Law Journal, 303, September 1987, Volume 2, Issue 2, Article
5 which I cite in my paper.</span></font></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><font color="#0000ff" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><span lang="FR" style="text-align:justify"><br></span></font></div><div class="gmail_default" style=""><font color="#0000ff" style="" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><span lang="FR" style="text-align:justify">Clem</span></font></div>


















<br></div></div>