<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; line-break: after-white-space;" class="">I really wonder how the CDC link worked.  The channels were electrically strange, and certainly not easily amenable to communicating with anything other than CDC controllers or perhaps a serial line through one of the front ends.<div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">I did hear of a proposal at NADC around 1977 to try to hook into telnet and ftp from a CDC using some hack of the serial stuff.  The idea didn’t impress me: it would have taken a lot of hacking to get a kludge working.  It always took a lot to make CDC hardware play well with others.<br class=""><div><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 5Dec 2017, at 3:24 AM, Paul Ruizendaal <<a href="mailto:pnr@planet.nl" class="">pnr@planet.nl</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><span style="font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; font-size: 18px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">- In 1974, the Lab’s CDC 6600 became the first online supercomputer when it was connected to ARPANET, the Internet’s predecessor.</span></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></div></body></html>