<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default"><font color="#0000ff" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif">dash as switches were always explained to me as from Multics.   Having used DEC systems, Univax and IBM systems originally with cards and ASR33s, I was not yet </font><font color="#0000ff" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">stubborn enough to see value one way or the other (the links in ROMs in my fingers were not yet programmed).  By the time I left CMU and the glass tty was all I was willing to use.  I had become a UNIX/C person more than anything else, so slashes as switches (and upper case and case folding) had become annoying and just seemed wrong.</font></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote"><font color="#ff0000">On Tue, Nov 28, 2017 at 8:19 AM, Noel Chiappa <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jnc@mercury.lcs.mit.edu" target="_blank">jnc@mercury.lcs.mit.edu</a>></span> wrote:<br></font><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><font color="#ff0000">According to "The Evolution of the Unix Timesharing System", full path names<br>
arrived later than I/O redirection, so by they time they needed a separator,<br>
'>' and '<' were gone.</font></blockquote><div><div class="gmail_default"><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">​</font><font color="#0000ff"><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">That was the impression I had had and I admit I think I must have either assumed it, heard it in conversation, or maybe read it at some point in this paper.   Cann't say when I started to think same, but I came to UNIX in Fifth and Sixth so, they were already there.  I was just learning the 'UNIX way' at the time.​   I guess because I was using so many different systems at the time, I was more willing to accept every dialect had its way of doing things.   As Greg points out EXEC-8 was hardly anything like TSS/360 and learned them together.   Same as TOPS/TWINEX and eventually VMS.   </font></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font color="#0000ff"><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif"><br></font></font></div><div class="gmail_default"><font color="#0000ff"><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">Funny, things is I left those other systems and then was forced to come back to them, first RT11 and then NOS/KRONOS and then VMS and I remember grumbling.  By then the ROMs had been forced in my muscle memory.</font></font></div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><font color="#ff0000">'/' also has the advantage of being a non-shift<div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;display:inline">​ ​</div>character!<br></font></blockquote><div class="gmail_default"><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">​</font><font color="#0000ff"><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">Hmm, so was dot, which is what TSS and MTS used.​  DEC was using it as the <base>.<ext> separator, but I think Ken could have used it as easily at the time since the idea of <ext> and exposing semantics of what the file was in the name was foreign to UNIX (although was used in other systems as we know).</font></font></div></div></div></div>