<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif">Sorry, yes -- which is why I think the exec hack first show up in the BSD kernel.  It was an efficiency trick on the PDP-11's.  The idea was to catch the change of shell as soon as possible.</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Apr 21, 2017 at 10:48 AM, Ron Natalie <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ron@ronnatalie.com" target="_blank">ron@ronnatalie.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple"><div class="m_6647149103177751405WordSection1"><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1f497d">Oldest actual use in a post I can find is 1997 <u></u><u></u></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><a name="m_6647149103177751405__MailEndCompose"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1f497d"><u></u> <u></u></span></a></p><div><p class="MsoNormal"><b><span style="font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif";color:#1f497d">I did find something I had completely forgot about.   The csh used to (probably still does?) differentiate between Bourne shell s<u>cripts and csh scripts by looking for #.<u></u><u></u></u></span></b></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#1f497d"><u></u> <u></u></span></p></div></div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>