<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><span style="font-family: Menlo-Regular; font-size: 11px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; float: none; display: inline !important;" class="">I suppose that it would make sense that all of AT&T's leading edge projects would use research Unix.  I've always heard of the original C++ to C translator but this is the first time I've actually seen it.</span><br style="font-family: Menlo-Regular; font-size: 11px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""></div></blockquote></div><br class=""><div class="">In case you’re interested, Bjarne Stroustrup has been helping me collect early versions of cfront here:</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><blockquote style="margin: 0 0 0 40px; border: none; padding: 0px;" class=""><div class=""><a href="http://www.softwarepreservation.org/projects/c_plus_plus/#cfront" class="">http://www.softwarepreservation.org/projects/c_plus_plus/#cfront</a></div></blockquote><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Previously we had located a listing of Release E (which we scanned), source for Release 1.0 of 10/10/85, and source for Release 3.0.3. From these 9th and 10th edition snapshots, cfront 1.2.2 6/10/87, AT&T C++ Translator 2.00 06/30/89, AT&T C++ Translator 2.1.0+ 04/01/90, and AT&T C++ Translator 2.1++ 08/24/90 join the list. </div></body></html>