<html><head></head><body>Well $999 would get you source..<br>
<br>
<a href="https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/32/93939063_729b710163_z.jpg?zz=1">https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/32/93939063_729b710163_z.jpg?zz=1</a><br>
<br>
With more and more magazines of the era being scanned and put online, I should try to find the 1800itsunix...<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On March 17, 2017 3:47:55 AM GMT+08:00, Dave Horsfall <dave@horsfall.org> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<pre class="k9mail">On Wed, 15 Mar 2017, Josh Good wrote:<br /><br /><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 1ex 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid #729fcf; padding-left: 1ex;"> It is obvious to me that RMS's GNU movement was aimed at solving that <br /> very problem. And if that was a problem, then the "UNIX openness" you <br /> talk about does not seem to have been very practical at all. At least, <br /> it was totally useless to PC hackers, like Linus Torvalds - he had to <br /> write his own UNIX, because he was not able to get any UNIX source code <br /> he could readily compile and run on his i386.<br /></blockquote><br />Perhaps I'm confused (not uncommon) but I have distinct memories of having <br />a source licence for my BSD/OS system on a 386...<br /></pre></blockquote></div><br>
-- <br>
Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.</body></html>