<div dir="ltr">Bill: "<span style="font-size:16px">MS-DOS was a runtime system, not an operating system"</span><div><span style="font-size:16px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px">Well said... that's completely true.</span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px">Those original floppies were I believe 160K. If you paid extra, the box would hold two drives. Later, IBM introduced double-sided drives, at 320K each.</span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px">The XT model, with a built-in hard drive (10MB as I recall) came out one-and-a-half years after the original, in 1983. With it came MS-DOS 2.0, with a hierarchical file system.</span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px">Since the forward slash was used for command-line options, paths used a backwards slash.</span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:16px">--Marc</span></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Jul 1, 2016 at 6:47 AM, William Cheswick <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ches@cheswick.com" target="_blank">ches@cheswick.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">>>​...​why didn't they have a more capable kernel than MS-DOS?<br>
​>I don't think they cared. or felt it was needed at the time (I disagreed then and still do).<br>
<br>
MS-DOS was a better choice at the time than Unix. It had to fit on floppies, and was very simple.<br>
<br>
“Unix is a system administrations nightmare” — dmr<br>
<br>
Actually, MS-DOS was a runtime system, not an operating system, despite the last two letters of its name.<br>
This is a term of art lost to antiquity.<br>
Run time systems offered a minimum of features: a loader, a file system, a crappy, built-in shell,<br>
I/O for keyboards, tape, screens, crude memory management, etc. No multiuser, no network stacks, no separate processes (mostly). DEC had several (RT11, RSTS, RSX) and the line is perhaps a little fuzzy: they were getting operating-ish.<br>
<br>
It all had to fit on a floppy (do I remember correctly that the original floppyies, SSSD, were 90KB?), run<br>
flight simulator and some business apps.  MSDOS lasted a decade, and served the PC world well, for all its<br>
crapiness.  Win 3.1 was an attempt at an OS, and Win 95 an actual one, with a network stack and everything.<br>
<br>
>I agree with 90% of what he says, but not about Algol 68.  He obviously<br>
>has a strong preference for small languages: it would be interesting<br>
>to see his uncensored opinions of C++, the Godzilla of our day as Ada<br>
<br>
I’d be astonished if he had anything good at all to say about C++.<br>
<br>
He’s still around…you could ask him...</blockquote></div><br></div>