<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=us-ascii"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class="">I understand there were a number of problems that went the other way.  Motorola dropped the ball, software<div class="">was buggy, and IBM needed an immediate answer.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">On the other hand, there was<div class="">no excuse for a Pascal compiler to be either large, buggy, or slow, even before Turbo Pascal.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On 30Jun 2016, at 10:05 AM, Marc Rochkind <<a href="mailto:rochkind@basepath.com" class="">rochkind@basepath.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><div style="font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; font-size: 18px; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;" class=""><span style="font-size: 12.8px;" class="">Not for those of us trying to write serious software. The IBM PC came out in August, 1981, and I left Bell Labs to write software for it full time about 5 months later. At the time, it seemed to me to represent the future, and that turned out to be a correct guess.</span></div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></div></blockquote></div><br class=""></div></div></body></html>