<div dir="ltr">Dan Cross: "... even if they didn't use Unix directly, it was an existence proof that such a thing was possible".<div><br></div><div>Indeed it was. IBM contracted with Interactive Systems (Heinz Lycklama's company, in Santa Monica) to produce PC/IX, which was complete System 3 for the IBM PC. 8088, 4.77MHz, and 512K of RAM (if I'm remembering the numbers correctly). It was my primary development system for the first edition of Advanced UNIX Programming.</div><div><br></div><div>As for why "IBM" didn't do something other than MS-DOS originally: It depends what you mean by "IBM". The PC was not originally strategic, although it might have become that way after a few years. It was just a small group in Boca Raton (as I recall) that whipped it out pretty quickly. MS-DOS was a good choice within the class of what then were known as personal computer operating systems (CP/M being the leader for 8080/Z80 Intel systems).</div><div><br></div><div>I don't think PC/IX would have run on a floppy-only system. And, if it would, it would have been a demonstration only--entirely impractical. IBM didn't provide a PC with a hard drive until later, and that's when PC/IX came along.</div><div><br></div><div>Don't forget that the IBM PC completely dominated office use where personal computers were needed. A runaway success. That makes me think that the technical solutions were correct for what the project was supposed to achieve.</div><div><br></div><div>When I tried to write responsive software for UNIX and UNIX-like OSes running on PCs, I could never achieve good results because the display support was inadequate. Typically, you treated the display like a terminal (escape sequences). MS-DOS allowed me to write to display memory directly, which what was made PC software so responsive.</div><div><br></div><div>To say it another way, UNIX on a PC was always just a port. No consideration was given to providing support for the way PCs were actually used. That didn't happen until Xerox PARC started to produce PCs (at a much higher cost, of course). The first decent "PC" was the Macintosh SE. The earlier Macs were dogs.</div><div><br></div><div>--Marc</div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Jun 30, 2016 at 11:07 AM, John Cowan <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:cowan@mercury.ccil.org" target="_blank">cowan@mercury.ccil.org</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Dan Cross scripsit:<br>
<span class=""><br>
> I've never understood why IBM didn't just write a real OS in a<br>
> high-level language instead of saddling the world with MS-DOS.<br>
<br>
</span>I think because to IBM "a real OS" meant MVS.  The difference between<br>
Unix and MS-DOS simply wasn't visible to them.<br>
<span class=""><br>
--<br>
John Cowan          <a href="http://www.ccil.org/~cowan" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://www.ccil.org/~cowan</a>        <a href="mailto:cowan@ccil.org">cowan@ccil.org</a><br>
</span>Don't be so humble.  You're not that great.<br>
        --Golda Meir<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>