<div dir="ltr">The best reference on that might be <<a href="http://article.olduse.net/4857@Aucbvax.UUCP">http://article.olduse.net/4857@Aucbvax.UUCP</a>>.<div><br></div><div>(Though also <<a href="http://article.olduse.net/203@brl-bmd.UUCP">http://article.olduse.net/203@brl-bmd.UUCP</a>> – not sure what's that one about.)</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 9:20 PM, Rocky Hotas <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:rockyhotas@post.com" target="_blank">rockyhotas@post.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hello everyone,<br>
I am Rocky and this is my first message. Before starting, I would like to thank you for all the valuable informations and stories you post here.<br>
About the History of Unix, I was wondering with another guy why the rc script has that name. As many of you already know, and according to NetBSD, FreeBSD, OpenBSD (current) manual,<br>
<br>
"The rc utility is the command script which controls" the startup of various services, "and is invoked by init(8)" (from DESCRIPTION).<br>
"The rc command appeared in 4.0BSD" (from HISTORY).<br>
<br>
Words may slightly change between the three distributions, but the meaning and the informations provided are the same. So, the etymology of rc does not appear in the man pages. Do you know how to recover it? Do (or did) the letters rc have some meaning in this context?<br>
Cheers,<br>
<br>
Rocky<br>
</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">Mantas Mikulėnas <<a href="mailto:grawity@gmail.com" target="_blank">grawity@gmail.com</a>></div></div>
</div>