<div dir="ltr">After a while, I shortened this in my mind to something like "the UNIX linker is called ld." No problem with that, but a few times I absent-mindedly typed "ln" for "linker", which generally produced very strange results.<div><br></div><div>--Marc</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Dec 10, 2015 at 2:08 PM, Doug McIlroy <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:doug@cs.dartmouth.edu" target="_blank">doug@cs.dartmouth.edu</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">That's exactly right. ld performs the same task as LOAD did on BESYS,<br>
except it builds the result in the file system rather than user<br>
space. Over time it became clear that "linker" would be a better<br>
term, but that didn't warrant canning the old name. Gresham's law<br>
then came into play and saddled us with the ponderous and<br>
misleading term, "link editor".<br>
<br>
Doug<br>
<br>
> My understanding, which predates my contact with Unix, is that the<br>
> original toochains for single-job machines consisted of the assembler<br>
> or compiler, the output of which was loaded directly into core with<br>
> the loader.  As things became more complicated (and slow), it made<br>
> sense to store the memory image somewhere on drum, and then load that<br>
> image directly when you wanted to run it.  And that in some systems<br>
> the name "loader" stuck, even though it no longer loaded.  Something<br>
> like the modern ISP use of the term "modem" to mean "router".  But I<br>
> don't have anything to back up this version; comments welcome.<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
TUHS mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:TUHS@minnie.tuhs.org">TUHS@minnie.tuhs.org</a><br>
<a href="http://minnie.tuhs.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/tuhs" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://minnie.tuhs.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/tuhs</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>