When did the `dc' command first appear?

Warren Toomey wkt at cs.adfa.edu.au
Tue Oct 26 10:07:44 AEST 1999


In article by Eric Fischer:
> Brian D. Chase writes,
> 
> > Just a quick question.  Was the `dc' command introduced with one of the
> > BSD releases or did it exist in an earlier version of Unix like the 6th or
> > 7th Edition?
> 
> It appears in the First Edition manual, and according to A Quarter
> Century of Unix, it's even older than that.
> eric

There's a binary of dc from either 1st or 2nd Edition in the PUPS Archive:

	-r---wxrw- 0/0            6846 Apr 14 06:50 1973 bin/dc

Warren

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Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 17:23:42 -0700
From: Brian D Chase <bdc at world.std.com>
To: Warren Toomey <wkt at cs.adfa.edu.au>
cc: Unix Heritage Society <pups at minnie.cs.adfa.edu.au>
Subject: Re: When did the `dc' command first appear?
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On Tue, 26 Oct 1999, Warren Toomey wrote:

> There's a binary of dc from either 1st or 2nd Edition in the PUPS Archive:
> 
> 	-r---wxrw- 0/0            6846 Apr 14 06:50 1973 bin/dc

Hmmm... did the permissions on files have the same meaning back in 1973 as
they do now?  Group and "other" writeable system binaries?  Tsk tsk tsk.

Well I suppose just because someone has written the Unix operating system,
it doesn't necessarily mean that they're a very good Unix sysadmin.

-brian.
--- Brian Chase | bdc at world.std.com | http://world.std.com/~bdc/ -----
 "Captain, we're experiencing a high rate of packet collisions!" -- K.


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From: Warren Toomey <wkt at cs.adfa.edu.au>
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Subject: Re: When did the `dc' command first appear?
In-Reply-To: <Pine.SGI.4.04.9910251718360.7714-100000 at world.std.com> from Brian D Chase at "Oct 25, 1999  5:23:42 pm"
To: pups at minnie.cs.adfa.edu.au (Unix Heritage Society)
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1999 10:27:09 +1000 (EST)
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In article by Brian D Chase:
> On Tue, 26 Oct 1999, Warren Toomey wrote:
> 
> > There's a binary of dc from either 1st or 2nd Edition in the PUPS Archive:
> > 
> > 	-r---wxrw- 0/0            6846 Apr 14 06:50 1973 bin/dc
> 
> Hmmm... did the permissions on files have the same meaning back in 1973 as
> they do now?  Group and "other" writeable system binaries?  Tsk tsk tsk.
> 
> Well I suppose just because someone has written the Unix operating system,
> it doesn't necessarily mean that they're a very good Unix sysadmin.

No, the perms have got stuffed up in conversion from 1st Ed permissions
to the tar archive. 1st Edition had no groups, and only had perms 

	01 write for other
	02 read for other
	04 write for owner		[ all octal values ]
	10 read for owner
	20 executable
	40 set-UID

Warren

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On Mon, 25 Oct 1999, Brian D Chase wrote:

> > 	-r---wxrw- 0/0            6846 Apr 14 06:50 1973 bin/dc
> 
> Hmmm... did the permissions on files have the same meaning back in 1973 as
> they do now?  Group and "other" writeable system binaries?  Tsk tsk tsk.

I don't believe the concept of group permissions existed then...

> Well I suppose just because someone has written the Unix operating system,
> it doesn't necessarily mean that they're a very good Unix sysadmin.

On the other hand, people actually trusted each other, because you
all worked with each other, and it was common for someone to write a
utility and stick it on the system.  Hint: /usr wasn't called that for
no reason...

-- 
Dave Horsfall VK2KFU  dave at geac.com.au  Ph: +61 2 9978-7493 Fx: +61 2 9978-7422
Geac Computers P/L (FGH Division) 2/57 Christie St, St Leonards 2065, Australia




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