<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif">Outstanding hack!</div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Fri, Nov 6, 2020 at 2:22 PM Theodore Y. Ts'o <<a href="mailto:tytso@mit.edu">tytso@mit.edu</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">On Fri, Nov 06, 2020 at 10:53:59AM -0500, Clem Cole wrote:<br>
> <br>
> I went to college with an electric typewriter and all my papers were done<br>
> on it in the fall of my freshman year (until I got access to UNIX).  I did<br>
> have an CS account for the PDP-10 and they had the XGP, but using it for<br>
> something like your papers was somewhat frowned upon.    However, the UNIX<br>
> boxes we often bought 'daisy wheel' typewriters that had RS-232C<br>
> interfaces.  Using nroff, I could then do my papers and run it off in the<br>
> admin's desk at night.<br>
<br>
When I was in high school, we had a box that could be fitted over an<br>
Olivetti electric typewriter's keyboard, which had solenoids to<br>
"type".  The other end had a parallel port and it was connected to a<br>
Heathkit H-89 CP/M system, and so rough drafts would be sent to the<br>
dot matrix printer, but for the final copy, it could look like it came<br>
out of a typewriter --- because technically, it did.  :-)<br>
<br>
                                - Ted<br>
</blockquote></div>